Latest Immigration Updates

On District Court Judge Dana Sabraw's ruling on the Trump Administration's family separation policy - June 26th, 2018

U.S. District Court Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego, issued a preliminary injunction on Tuesday night requiring that nearly all children younger than 5 be returned to their parents within 14 days and that older children be returned within 30 days. Criticizing the Trump administration for what he called “a chaotic circumstance of the Government’s own making,” Sabraw said it was a “startling reality” that no adequate planning had been done before officials embarked on a policy to separate children from parents kept in immigration custody or referred for criminal prosecution. The practice has led to more than 2,300 children being separated from their parents or other family members.
 

On the Supreme Court ruling in Trump v. Hawaii - June 26th, 2018

Today’s Supreme Court ruling upholding the President’s discriminatory Muslim Ban is a stain on our country. We are deeply disappointed that this ruling rewards some of the very worst instincts in the United States: racism, xenophobia, and islamophobia. We stand with our Muslim neighbors in condemning this ruling and demand that our elected leaders take action to rescind and dismantle it.
 

On Jeff Sessions' decision on the matter of A-B- - June 11th, 2018

On Monday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a decision in a pending deportation case that will have devastating consequences for people seeking asylum protections in our country. Mr. Sessions ruled that our immigration system should generally deny claims of asylum “pertaining to domestic violence or gang violence perpetrated by non-governmental actors.” In doing so, he overruled an earlier decision from the Obama Administration that had clarified that some asylum claims based on domestic violence could qualify for protection. Read our thoughts on this decision here.
 

An update on NWIRP's efforts to assist the asylum seekers detained at the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac - June 8th, 2018

The information we have is that a total of 209 asylum seekers are at FDC, 177 women and 32 men. As of mid-day today, we had been able to interview 11 of them (our staff was there this afternoon and seeing additional people). Of the 11 we have interviewed so far, 7 were mothers who had been separated from their children at the border. Our staff and volunteer attorneys will continue to conduct screenings of individuals we identify over the weekend. Right now, the volunteers we need are Spanish-speaking attorneys, particularly with immigration background. We have been asked how other community members can get involved. We encourage those who can to attend the rally planned for tomorrow Saturday June 9th at 1:30P. And we also invite you to contact your federal representatives to express your outrage at this situation.
 

The Trump Administration's 'Zero Tolerance Policy' Hits Washington State - June 7th, 2018

The Trump Administration's policy of separating children from their parents at the border is now impacting Washington State. We have learned that mothers who have been separated from their children after crossing the southern border are now being held in federal detention in Washington State. NWIRP staff first learned of this development after meeting with two women yesterday, June 6th. The two women arrived at the United States' southern border with their young daughters in mid-May seeking asylum. Both were separated from their children shortly after they were apprehended by Border Patrol. The two women were charged with the misdemeanor crime of unlawful entry and sentenced to time served.

But instead of being returned to their children, who are now held at different government facilities, the two women were transferred to Washington State while they proceed forward with the asylum process. The two women reported that approximately 60 other women in similar circumstances are currently being held in the same section of the Federal Detention Center (FDC) in SeaTac (not the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma where asylum seekers are usually detained). Moreover, there are now reports of an additional group of 60 asylum seekers being held in a separate section of the FDC at SeaTac. Our staff is actively working to reach as many of them as possible to provide legal assistance.
 

On the Department of Homeland Security's decision to End Temporary Protected Status for Honduras - May 4th, 2018

On Friday, May 4th, DHS secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced the government's decision to end TPS status for Honduras after 19 years. TPS allows people to live and work in the United States while their country experiences armed conflict, environmental disasters, and extraordinary and temporary conditions. Over 57,000 Hondurans with TPS currently live and work in the United States. This announcement comes with a delayed effective date of January 5th, 2020. Honduran TPS holders may re-register through August 6th, 2018.
 

On the Department of Homeland Security's decision to End Temporary Protected Status for Nepal - April 26th, 2018

On Thursday, April 26th, DHS secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced the government's decision to end TPS status for Nepal after 3 years. TPS allows people to live and work in the United States while their country experiences armed conflict, environmental disasters, and extraordinary and temporary conditions. Nearly 9,000 Nepalese with TPS currently live and work in the United States. This announcement comes with a delayed effective date of June 24th, 2019. Nepalese TPS holders may re-register through July 23rd, 2018.
 

On United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Accepting DACA Renewal Applications - January 16th, 2018

USCIS has posted instructions on how it will begin accepting DACA renewal applications in response to a federal judge's decision. This only applies to individuals who already have had DACA granted in the past and not to people who would like to pursue initial applications. Here is a link to their announcement. In addition, our colleagues at Mission Asset Fund have announced that they are accepting applications for scholarships to pay for the renewal application fee at this link.
 

On the Department of Homeland Security's decision to End Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador - January 8th, 2018

On Monday, January 8th, DHS secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced the government's decision to end TPS status for El Salvador after 17 years. TPS allows people to live and work in the United States while their country experiences armed conflict, environmental disasters, and extraordinary and temporary conditions. Over 200,000 Salvadorans with TPS currently live and work in the United States. This announcement comes with a delayed effective date of September 9th, 2019. Salvadoran TPS holders may apply for one extension before that date.
 

On the Department of Homeland Security's decision to End Temporary Protected Status for Haiti - November 20th, 2017

On Monday, November 20th, DHS secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced the government's decision to end TPS status for Haiti after 7 years. TPS allows people to live and work in the United States while their country experiences armed conflict, environmental disasters, and extraordinary and temporary conditions. Nearly 60,000 Haitians with TPS currently live and work in the United States. This announcement comes with a delayed effective date of July 22nd, 2019. Haitian TPS holders may re-register by March 19th, 2018.
 

On the Partial Implementation of the Travel Ban - June 29th, 2017

We have received a number of questions about resources for people impacted by the partial implementation of the President's executive orders. We anticipate that most of the impact of the implementation will happen abroad as people from the six designated countries are denied visas on the basis of the executive order.

 
We do not anticipate the level of problems that we saw at SeaTac or other airports in January because people who already have visas should not be rejected due to the travel ban and, if they are, it is likely to happen before they board. Nonetheless, as a precaution in case people do have problems, a wonderful group of volunteer attorneys (coordinated by our colleagues at Lane Powell) will have one volunteer at the airport today through Saturday to be available to respond to concerns people at the airport might have and to potentially respond if someone is in fact detained at SeaTac.

 
If you have a friend or family who is detained at SeaTac as a result of the travel ban, you can call 1-844-RAID-REP (1-844-724-3737) to be connected to assistance there.
 

On the Supreme Court's Stay of the Injunction on the Travel Ban - June 26th, 2017

The “Muslim ban” executive orders issued by the President earlier this year are contrary to American values of religious tolerance and inclusion. We are pleased that the Supreme Court, like several other federal courts, has today rejected the President’s argument that his actions cannot be reviewed by the judiciary.

 
Furthermore, we are heartened that many of the people originally affected by this discriminatory ban – those with strong ties to people or organizations in the United States – will continue to be able to re-unite with their families or pursue education or career opportunities in this country.

 
However, we are deeply concerned that thousands of others who do not have the privilege of strong ties to the United States – including refugees with compelling humanitarian needs or serious medical conditions who have already undergone an exhaustive process to enter the United States – will be subjected to a policy driven by religious intolerance, racial animus, and discrimination. We are deeply disappointed that the Court has allowed any portion of this “Muslim ban” to move forward.

 

DACA Advisory for June 16th, 2017

Recently, the Trump Administration has made statements regarding the future of the DACA program. While they indicated the program would be kept in place on June 15th, later that same day they walked that promise back. Because of this uncertainty, we believe that each individual should make their own decision regarding whether to apply for this program after being informed of the risks and benefits, but
provide these recommendations to those who have asked us for guidance. In all cases, we recommend that you consult with an attorney or accredited representative.

 

Read the Advisory

 

On the Revised Travel Ban Issued March 6th, 2017

In January, President Trump signed an executive order which led to chaos in airports across the country and was quickly the subject of lawsuits across the country, including a lawsuit from Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. On February 3rd, a federal district court in Washington State issued a nationwide temporary restraining order, prohibiting the federal government from enforcing much of the executive order. That federal court decision was then upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the implementation of the executive order has been suspended since that time.
 
On March 6th, President Trump signed a new executive order with the same title, which goes into effect on March 16th and revokes the previous executive order he issued in January. Northwest Immigrant Rights Project has issued a statement denouncing the new executive order.
 
Our partners at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) have put together a downloadable document offering their analysis of this latest executive order, which can be accessed at this link.
 

On the President's recent Executive Actions on Immigration

On January 25th, the President issued two executive actions on immigration. The first orders the construction of a physical structure on the United States-Mexico border as well as requiring Customs and Border Protection to detain every unauthorized migrant they catch crossing the United States border. The second covers several issues, including an early plan to strip federal funds from "sanctuary cities."  He will likely be issuing additional actions in the coming future. We will update this page shortly with information about these actions.
 

On the Results of the 2016 Presidential Election

The president-elect's proposed immigration policies stand in opposition to our vision of a world in which all people have the opportunity to live safely with the ones they love.

Northwest Immigrant Rights Project will continue to work for people seeking to stay together with their families, find safety from violence in their homes or home countries, and find new opportunities in work and education. Our work is more important now than ever.

To that end, we are hosting and participating in several events for community members with questions after the results of the recent election. Check out the growing list of events at this link.

 

Latest Immigration Resources and Advisories

We have been receiving a number of questions about the future of the DACA program following the election of Donald Trump as President. This bilingual (English and Spanish) community advisory outlines our recommendations for community members who have applied for DACA or who are interested in applying. Read the advisory

 

This is a Question and Answer (Q&A) for domestic violence and sexual assault (DV/SA) advocates and attorneys who are serving immigrant survivors of gender-based violence, both undocumented survivors, and survivors who may be eligible for VAWA self-petitions, U visas, T visas or applying for gender-based asylum. Read the Q&A

 

This guide was created for educators, school support staff and service providers who teach, mentor and help open the doors of opportunity for undocumented youth and unaccompanied and refugee children
currently living in the United States. Educators, school support staff and service providers are often the first individuals a student and/or family comes out to as undocumented. Moreover, they are often the first ones to witness the impact of increased enforcement measures on students and their families. It’s critically important that educators, school support staff and service providers know the tools and resources available to help protect and prepare youth and families for an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raid. Read the Guide